Is your wicked past hurting your career?

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Last night my wife and I watched the 1955 version of “To Catch a Thief” starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It’s an enjoyable diversion, even if just for the scenic French landscapes and beaches.

Grant is a reformed jewel thief, John Robie, who was in his day known as “The Cat”. He has paid for his crimes and is trying to live a quiet retirement but when a series of high-profile jewel heists occur, the police and the townspeople believe that “The Cat” is up to his old tricks.

Grant seeks to prove his innocence and redeem his name by using his skills and knowledge to catch the real thief in the act.

The central theme of the film is the fragility of reputation. It’s hard to build, easy to lose, and next to impossible to regain.

Our reputations are what people know about us, or think they know, and what they say or do as a result. Jeff Bezos was speaking about reputation when he said, “Your brand is what other people say about you when you’re not in the room.”

What, pray tell, are your clients saying about you?

You have spent years building your reputation. It is your most valuable asset. I hope you have been equally diligent about protecting it.

We must all watch what we say and what we do. We must continually listen to what the town’s people are saying about us. I think you know that. Lawyers are by nature cautious and closed mouth about things that don’t need to be said. I think this is one reason why so many lawyers are loathe to use social media.

That doesn’t mean we can merely let our work speak for us. Clients hire lawyers they know, like, and trust, and you have to make some effort to get them to do this.

So yeah, there are risks and we have to take them. Fortunately, building your reputation doesn’t require the elimination of all risks, only the intelligent management of them.

So be smart. Don’t don’t steal any jewels. Or piss off the wrong people.

And remember what the watch commander on the police drama, “Hill Street Blues,” always said at the end of each briefing: “Let’s be careful out there”.

Get clients to know, like, and trust you. Here’s the formula

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