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The practice you want, the marketing you’ll need

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Yesterday, I saw an article with the title, “The retirement you want, the money you’ll need”. Good title. I took it and wrote the title of the post you’re reading now.

The point? You can get ideas for content and headlines just about anywhere. But only if you’re looking for them.

And by looking, I don’t mean scouring through blogs or your incoming email hunting for ideas. I mean being open to ideas finding you and being ready to write them down when they do.

I find ideas in many places. You will, too. Make sure you have an “idea” file or tag, read widely and deeply, and write down anything that strikes you, even if it seems silly or done-to-death. Develop the habit of finding and recording ideas first. Quality can come later.

Had you encountered the original title that inspired this post, you might have come up with a headline like, “The settlement you want, the lawyer you’ll need,” “The security you want, the legal protection you’ll need,” or, “The lawyer you want, the questions you’ll need to ask”.

Like these? They’re yours.

Developing the habit of collecting titles and ideas will pay many dividends. Continually fill your idea folder, regularly sift through it, and you’ll never run out of things to write about or effective headlines or titles to describe them.

I save my ideas in Evernote

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A simple way to write faster and better 

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“Don’t edit while you write” we are told. Get the words out of your head and down on paper without concern for clarity, grammar, usage, or spelling. Get your critical mind out of the way and write. Edit later.

It’s good advice and no doubt you follow it to some extent. It improves the quality and speed of your writing, especially if you feel stuck and don’t know what to say.

Someone once summarized this advice by saying, “Write drunk, edit sober.” I offer no comment on whether this advice should be followed literally but research confirms the value of doing something similar:

Write while groggy.

Apparently, we are more creative when we are sleepy. I assume that’s because our critical mind is less engaged, allowing us to write a first draft (or solve problems, as was done in the research) more quickly and easily.

So, if you’re usually slower in the morning, that’s when you might want to get some words on paper. Especially before you have that first cup of coffee. If you tire in the afternoon, you might try writing later in your day.

Are there other ways to “turn off” our critical mind without being sleepy or drunk or using willpower?

I think so.

I often put on headphones and listen to brain.fm to help me focus. Sometimes, I listen to regular music (new age or classical, thank you.) Sometimes, I listen to talk radio while writing, letting the voices blend into the background. This morning, I had a news video playing while writing this. Writing in a coffee shop does the same thing for many people.

I also get first drafts done by dictating into my phone on my walk or when I’m in the car.

What do you do to turn off your critical mind?

Your website can bring in more clients 

 

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Procrastination might be your friend

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In an interview, Ray Bradbury spoke about writer’s block, noting that it’s a warning that you’re doing the wrong thing:

“What if you have a blockage and you don’t know what to do about it? Well, it’s obvious you’re doing the wrong thing, aren’t you? . . . You’re being warned, aren’t you? Your subconscious is saying I don’t like you anymore. You’re writing about things I don’t give a damn for. . . If you have writers’ block you can cure it this evening by stopping what you’re doing and writing something else. You picked the wrong subject.”

So, trust your gut.

Could the same be said whenever we find ourselves procrastinating?

I think it could. But things aren’t that simple.

If you’re doing work for a client, the work has to be done. You can’t change the work just because your gut’s telling you something’s not right.

But that doesn’t mean we should ignore our gut. It might be trying to do you a favor.

When you feel resistance to doing something, take a moment to ask yourself some questions:

  1. Does this have to be done? Maybe there’s another way to accomplish the same result. It couldn’t hurt to take a moment to consider this.
  2. If the work has to be done, does it have to be done now? Maybe a delay would help you sort out some things that your gut says are a problem.
  3. Am I the one who has to do it? If someone else could do it, that might be a simple solution to what ails ya.
  4. Is there another way to get it done? If the work has to be done, now, by you, maybe you can do it in some other way? How might you do it differently?

Let’s noodle for a moment about that last one.

Suppose you are hired to write an appellate brief but your gut is telling you there’s a problem. You’re blocked, but you know it has to be done and you’re the one to do it.

Instead of writing the brief the way you usually do it–research, outline, first draft, etc.–how about trying a different process? Maybe start with a quick stream-of-consciousness draft of what’s on your mind about the case or the people, before you do any research. Maybe by doing that, you’ll realize some things about the case you didn’t think about before. And maybe this will provide you with a breakthrough and help you turn out a brilliant piece of work.

All hail your gut. It knows things you don’t know.

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Write like you talk?

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We’re often told to “write like you talk”. Talk to the reader, on paper, as if you’re having a personal conversation. Use simple words and short sentences, to make your message clear and easy to understand.

But spoken communication is disjointed and repetitive. Our meaning is often ambiguous. We use gestures, pauses, facial expressions, and other cues, to provide context and clarity to our message. When we sense that the listener isn’t following us, we can repeat the thought with different words and examples. We can make sure they understand before we continue.

We can’t do this in writing, however, so if you write literally like you talk, your writing will be harder to understand, not easier.

Instead of “write like you talk,” the mantra should be, “write the first draft like you talk.”

When you edit that draft, change the order of your ideas so they flow more logically. Choose more descriptive words. Tighten sentences. Tell a story instead of piling on the facts.

Do another pass, to make the draft even clearer. Depending on your audience, consider adding (or adding back) slang, cliches, and buzz words, and using visual devices to mimic the spoken word.

K?

Make the words look good on the page. Then, read the draft out loud, to hear what your reader will hear in their head when they read it.

Listen to the sound of the words and their cadence. Pay attention to the images they conjure and the emotions they invoke.

CS Lewis said, “Write with the ear, not the eye.” Make sure your words not only say what you mean, make sure they sound good.

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Say what?

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You may have heard the pejorative term “hairography”. According to the Urban Dictionary, this is “choreography using a lot of dance movement with the head that causes the hair to thrash about.” Basically, it’s done to disguise a lack of dancing skills.

Sadly, some lawyers do something similar when they hide behind big words and legalese.

I call it “lexography”.

I have to admit, as a fledgling attorney, I spoke the lingua franca. My letters and pleadings sounded like they were written in another century. Formal, stilted, passive voice, and boring.

I didn’t want to be seen as lacking experience in the arcane world of the fraternity I had recently joined. I wanted to sound like a lawyer and I thought that’s what I had to do.

I even did it with clients. I was young (and looked it) and I wanted to sound like a grown up.

It all ended quickly. I hated the way I sounded, and it was too much work to keep up, so I said, “the hell with it” and I stopped.

What a relief!

I spoke plainly. Simple words. Colloquial expressions. Cliches.

I used short sentences.

Like this.

Nobody complained or looked down on me. Nobody refused to hire me because I sounded inexperienced or unprofessional.

So, if you’re new to this club, or you (still) have issues with “sounding like a lawyer,” let it go.

I get a lot of email from lawyers. Some lawyers (lawyers!) can’t communicate a cogent thought to save their life.

Seriously. I can’t understand them.

C’mon, people. We are word merchants, you and I. We get paid to communicate. We need to be on top of our game. Better than good. Clear, concise, and persuasive.

You don’t need to be eloquent but if writing doesn’t come naturally to you, do what you have to do to get better. Take classes, get an editor, read outside your field.

Get a writing “workout partner”. Get lots of practice. And most of all, have fun with it. You’ll be glad you did. So will your clients.

How to write a “special report” that brings in clients

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What if I’m right?

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I get it. The two reasons you don’t have an email newsletter or blog or, if you do, you don’t write or post very often:

You don’t have enough to write about, and/or, you don’t have the time to do it.

I say you do. I say you have plenty to write about, way more than you realize, and you have more than enough time to do it.

Give me a chance to prove it.

Set up a new notebook or file for this email/blog project, open a page and label it “ideas”. If you have any that come to mind, write them down. If you have other files with blog post or content ideas you’ve collected, add them to your new file.

Go through your hard drive, reading list, saved article files, and do the same.

Next, write down the questions prospective clients and new clients typically ask you–about the law, procedure or process, about their legal rights and options, about what you can do to help them.

You should be able to quickly write down ten or twenty questions.

If you find yourself running short, visit some online forums where people post questions for attorneys to answer, and see what’s being asked.

You can also visit article directories, other attorney’s blogs, and websites that feature legal content and see what visitors are asking in the comments. You can search your keywords on social media and see what people are talking about.

Okay, that’s enough for now. More than enough, actually. You should now have enough ideas to keep you busy for the next several years.

Will you have the time to use those ideas? Let’s find out.

Go through your idea list and pick one. It doesn’t matter what it is, just pick something you have an opinion on or experience with, or something that interests you that you think might interest others.

Now, write down three words or phrases related to that idea.

If you’re a personal injury attorney and you’ve chosen to write a response to the question, “How much is my case worth?” your three words might be, “damages, liability, and insurance,” for example.

Next, take your idea and your key words, set a timer for five minutes and start writing. You can type or use a pen or dictate but don’t stop writing (or talking) until the five minutes is up.

Don’t edit, don’t worry about grammar or punctuation, don’t slow down or stop. Just keep pushing your pen or pounding the keys.

For. Five. Whole. Minutes.

I don’t care how busy you are, you can write for five minutes.

When you’re done, you probably learned that

  • You have a lot to say about certain subjects
  • You can get a lot of words on a page in five minutes
  • You wind up with a mess but it’s not as bad as you thought

At least that’s what I found out the first time I did this exercise.

You now have the first draft of an email or blog post or article. Put it aside and re-write or edit it later. When you’re done, you should have a few hundred words, enough for a blog post or email.

Then, tomorrow, or next week at this time, do it again. Pick another idea, write down three words, write for five minutes, edit later.

Continue doing this until you have at least ten posts or emails.

Now it’s time to decide what to do with them.

You could start a blog. You’ll have ten weeks (or days) worth of material to post.

You could start a newsletter. You’ll have ten emails to load into your autoresponder.

Or you can gather up what you’ve written and turn them into an ebook or report.

The point is, you now know you can do this. You can write something in 30 minutes or less, including editing. (Okay, it might take longer at first but you’ll get faster.)

The only remaining question is, “Should you?” Will it be worth it for you to write something once or twice a week and post or email it? Will it bring in business?

There’s only one way to find out.

For more ideas, and more ways to get ideas, get this

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The simplest way to persuade people

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Yesterday, I said that the goal of your professional writing is to persuade people to do something and that you should decide what that is before you write. Knowing what you want them to do allows you to tailor your writing to your call to action.

If you want readers to download your free report, for example, you might use some of the content of that report in your post, leaving the reader hungry to hear more.

One of the simplest ways to persuade people is through repetition. Tell them what to do in the body of the text and again at the end. The more often they hear what to do, the more likely they are to do it.

You can also use repetition by writing more frequently. Instead of long emails once a month, for example, write short emails once a week.Each message is another opportunity to tell them what to do.

You’ll notice that my emails are relatively short. That’s intentional. I want you to read my email as soon as you get it. I know that if you save it for later, you might never get around to it, and that doesn’t help either one of us.

Shorter pieces are also easier and quicker to write. Instead of spending three hours crafting a comprehensive article, you can take 15 minutes to write a few paragraphs and get it out the door.

Longer pieces certainly have their place. The sales letter for my first referral course was 32 pages. But I wouldn’t expect you to read that much every day.

If you want to persuade more people, write shorter emails and send them more often. You’ll have that many more opportunities to tell people to do what to do.

Get more referrals with less effort. Here’s how

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When you’re done reading this, there’s something I want you to do

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The next time you sit down to write something, before you begin, ask yourself, “What do I want them to do?”

Figure out what you want your reader or listener, judge or jury, prospect or client, to do when they are done hearing your words.

Yes, begin with the end in mind.

Why? Because unless you’re writing to entertain, you want the reader to do something. That’s the only way they will get a result. And you want them to get a result because that’s good for them and good for you.

When someone reads your article, for example, and that article persuades them to do something, e.g., read another article, sign up for your newsletter, contact you to ask questions, or contact you to make an appointment, they benefit and so do you. They get information or help and you get a new client or someone who is moving in that direction.

Don’t write merely to inform. Write to persuade. And don’t assume they know what to do next, tell them.

You’re almost done reading this. When you’re done, I want you to write the sentence, “What do I want them to do?” on a sticky note and post it somewhere on your desk or your computer where you’ll be able to see it when you are writing.

If you do, you’ll be more likely to ask yourself that question when you’re writing and if you do that, I know you’ll get better results.

Better results is good for you, obviously, and also good for me. As you get better results from my advice, you’ll be more likely to come back for more advice, more likely to buy my products and services, and more likely to tell others about me.

Decide what you want your reader to do and persuade them to do it. I’ll have some thoughts on how to do that in a future post, so stay tuned.

(See what I did there?)

Know other lawyers? Here’s how to get them to send you more referrals

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Darth Vader would have made a terrible lawyer

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You have a marketing voice and it can make or break you.

Your marketing voice is the personality you present in your writing, in your presentations, and in conversations. It paints a picture of who you are and what it would be like to work with you. Your voice either attracts people to you or pushes them away.

If you sound arrogant, overly aggressive, or overly formal, you push people away. If you sound weak or overly casual, you do the same.

People expect a lawyer to sound like a professional. Not too hot or too cold. They want you to be strong and confident but even-tempered. Friendly and approachable but not a pushover. They want you to speak to them, not down to them. They want you to be conversational, not academic.

A little toughness. A little charm.

Your marketing voice–on your website, in your newsletter, in your presentations–should resonate with your target market. It should attract them and inspire them to connect with you. It should make them trust you and choose you to represent them.

If your marketing voice is working for you, great. If not, get some help. Get a marketing pro or a writer to look at your writing and presentations and give you some advice. Or hire them and have them do a makeover.

How to write a report that attracts new clients

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Pushing politically correct envelopes for fun and profit

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Yesterday, I used a phrase that some might say is politically incorrect. I said, “They may love you like a brother.”

Did you notice? Did you wonder why I didn’t add “or sister”? Did you wonder why I didn’t include the 71 gender identification options available on Facebook?

Am I sexist or just sloppy? Was it a slip or did I do it on purpose, poking a finger in the collective eye of the social justice warriors who have kidnapped our language and are holding it for ransom?

I wasn’t making a political statement. I did it because “Love you like a brother” is a term of art and makes the writing better.

But I admit that in today’s hyper-sensitive social climate it also makes the writing edgier.

And that’s a good thing.

Edgier writing is better writing. It makes people slow down and think about what they just read. A thinking reader is a reader who is likely to keep reading and come back for more.

You should go for the same thing in your writing.

I’m not advocating anything radical. You don’t need to immolate yourself in public. Just take a stroll off the well-worn path in the middle of the road and wave a little flag. Get people to notice that you said something unexpected and maybe a bit controversial, instead of the same bland and boring things everyone else says.

Yes, that means you have to take some chances. Go out on some limbs. And yes, that means you might get labeled by people who don’t “get” you or that have no sense of humor. You might lose some followers. Even a client or two. But the people who stick with you will bring others who also like the cut of your jib.

Some might even love you like a brother.

Go write something that will bring in some new clients

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